attract


attract
at|tract
W2S2 [əˈtrækt] v [T]
[Date: 1400-1500; : Latin; Origin: , past participle of attrahere, from ad- 'to' + trahere 'to pull']
1.) to make someone interested in something, or make them want to take part in something
attract sb to sth
What attracted me most to the job was the chance to travel.
attract attention/interest etc
The story has attracted a lot of interest from the media.
2.) be attracted to sb
to feel that you like someone and want to have a sexual relationship with them
I'm not usually attracted to blondes.
3.) to make someone like or admire something or feel romantically interested in someone
I guess it was his eyes that attracted me first.
4.) to make someone or something move towards another thing
Leftover food attracts flies.
low rents designed to attract new businesses to the area

Dictionary of contemporary English. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • attract — at‧tract [əˈtrækt] verb [transitive] 1. to make someone want to buy something, do something, or take part in something: • Advertisements for a new headmaster attracted 120 candidates. attract somebody to something • What attracted me most to the… …   Financial and business terms

  • attract — vb Attract, allure, charm, fascinate, bewitch, enchant, captivate mean to draw another by exerting an irresistible or compelling influence over him. The same distinctions in implications and connotations are observable in the adjectival forms of… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Attract — At*tract , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Attracted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Attracting}.] [L. attractus, p. p. of attrahere; ad + trahere to draw. See {Trace}, v. t.] 1. To draw to, or cause to tend to; esp. to cause to approach, adhere, or combine; or to cause …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • attract — [ə trakt′] vt. [ME attracten < L attractus, pp. of attrahere, to draw to < ad , to + trahere, DRAW] 1. to draw to itself or oneself; make approach or adhere [magnets attract iron] 2. to get the admiration, attention, etc. of; allure [his… …   English World dictionary

  • attract — early 15c., from L. attractus, pp. of attrahere to draw, pull; to attract, from ad to (see AD (Cf. ad )) + trahere draw (see TRACT (Cf. tract) (1)). Originally a medical term for the body s tendency to absorb fluids, nourishment, etc., or for a… …   Etymology dictionary

  • Attract — At*tract , n. Attraction. [Obs.] Hudibras. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • attract — index bait (lure), coax, interest, inveigle, lure, motivate Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • attract — [v] draw attention allure, appeal to, bait, beckon, beguile, bewitch, bring, captivate, charm, come on*, court, drag, draw, enchant, endear, engage, enthrall, entice, entrance, exert influence, fascinate, freak out*, give the comeon*, go over big …   New thesaurus

  • attract — ► VERB 1) draw in by offering something interesting or advantageous. 2) cause (a specified reaction). 3) (often be attracted to) cause to have a liking for or interest in. 4) draw (something) closer by exerting a force. DERIVATIVES attractor noun …   English terms dictionary

  • attract */*/*/ — UK [əˈtrækt] / US verb [transitive] Word forms attract : present tense I/you/we/they attract he/she/it attracts present participle attracting past tense attracted past participle attracted 1) a) to make someone interested in something so that… …   English dictionary

  • attract — 01. The meat they ve been putting in the garbage is starting to [attract] rats. 02. His wife is very [attractive], and always gets lots of attention from the men at parties. 03. We put a rotten fish head in the trap to [attract] the shrimp. 04.… …   Grammatical examples in English


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